Reality Check, Part Deux

(I am seeing stitch points on my divas’ ears!!!! Digitizing is invading my reality…so, I need to contemplate a different reality at the end of this day…)

Great comments and emails about this issue, folks. Thank you so much. I love reading your thoughts.

Miss Alison wrote a bit that, once again, got to the heart of the matter of ID dress design.

I love the Silverlode dresses. Rachel is a true artist. The beauty is in the incredible detail work she does. They really confirm that ID dresses can be true pieces of art worthy of a gallery, to me–I only wish I could attain that level of artisty, myself.

However, and this is a BIG however, I don’t think they show well on stage. Because she tends to go for the details and uses complimentary colours (and rarely any unusual fabrics), they tend to blend at a distance. What is a stunningly detailed and gorgeous dress up close can be a swamp of green (or blue, or pink) on stage, just as what is hideously garish and overwhelming up close can be quite striking and interesting on stage. Add into that the utter disregard for trends (something else I wish I had in me!), and she has a very niche market to sell to.

None of this negates the utter beauty of her work, mind. It does lessen her audience of likely buyers, though. I think Cari Buziak runs into the same problem: beautiful, detailed work that tends to be so detailed as to lose itself on stage.

Also, $850? Madness! There is so much detail involved in her dresses they truly do deserve a very high asking price, trial run or not. I’m sure it will be snatched up quickly. If I’m ever rich, I want one just to have as an art piece in my house!

I understand what Alison is saying about the design elements and their impact. She is right…as she is right about the garish being effective from a distance on a stage. And she is right about how dresses by Silverlode and Buziak tend to get lost from a distance. The enjoyment to be had from these gorgeous dresses are close up. It is a choice.

Thanks for saying it so well, Ali.

I have been thinking a lot about this the past couple of days…in between stitch points…all the creative issues that artworks like Rachel’s bring up. What Ali says about the visual impact of design is so very true. While I can and do deal with the larger issue of shape and form, design as we know it in ID has always been basically beyond me. I am an editor when it comes to design…I can tell you when the design parts do not work, and I can tell you when your vision is fuc.. messing with the digitizer, but I cannot come up with the elemental parts myself. Really, truly sucks for me, but there it is!

I had the opportunity to see a Gavin up close and personal about a year ago. I will be honest here because it will serve an illustrative purpose…I hated everything about it. The colors, the design, the whole organization of the dress was awful to me. To continue with a desciption of the repugnance I felt would be off-putting…get it? At the time, Susan said that she was sure that it worked on stage… and I worried about our association for the first time.

One month later, I saw the dress in action at a feis, and I was blown away! Un-freaking-believable…it worked!! From that performance distance on a dancer with the right coloring, it was spectacular. Everything about it was strong, coordinated, and right. I hope the dancer’s mama did not think I was a stalker because I could not let her out of my sight even after she danced!!!

It was such a lesson to me. I already knew that I could trust Susan’s unbelievable sense of color, but I had never seen a combination like that Gavin. I truly now just go with the flow with Susan. She does listen to me when I gag on an experiment, but her combinations usually leave me in awe. It expands my view.

I truly admire what designers like Susan and Alison do. They have a grasp on the visual purpose that ID dress designs serve…and I now know what works because of Susan.

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