Corset-style Bodice

— In IDDressmaking@yahoogroups.com, “snipper0104” <musicalpair3@…> wrote:
>
> Can anyone please tell me if there are directions to alter the Feisdress pattern for the corset-
> style bodice? I’m assuming this is a one-piece dress because of fit issues. I have a design I’d
> like to try and I think it would look best with the corset top. Thanks so much.
>
> Debbie

I responded, but wanted to move it here to add pics.

I have done this in one configuration or another onseveral dresses.  Only 2 were specifically sweetheart/corset line, while the others were v-neckline variations, but my construction is the same.  This method can also be used for asymmetrical bodice colors as well

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Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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Embroidered for MJ Farr
MJ Farr 2009 (1)

MJ bodice front

Embroidered for Colleen Murphy
Good photo of color

Pinned, no zipper

I am such a freak about symmetrical placement that this is what I do:

1 – Cut the full bodice out of the least expensive of the 2 bodice fabrics.  Let’s say I am going to use velvet for the corset body, so I would cut out the bodice using the fabric that will show above the corset neck/bust line.  Call this fabric 1.

2 – draw the sweetheart line onto the paper pattern pieces.  Decide where the shoulder/ side seams will meet (if necessary) so the front and back meet up neatly.  Cut the top and bottom apart on that line.  You have not added any seam allowance to that line.

3 – cut the velvet bodice using the bottom of the separated pattern pieces.  Call this fabric 2.

4 – Lay the cut velvet pieces onto the full bodice pieces you cut before.  Now you have to decide if you are going to keep all of fabric 1.  I have done 1 of 2 things: a) kept all of fabric 1 to act as a stabilizer for fabric 2 ; or b) cut fabric 1 free behind fabric 2 after sewing them both together to keep the bodice from being too bulky.  No matter what I decide, after I have lined up the pieces I pin or baste them together so I can sew a narrow zigzag stitch at the edges where the fabrics overlap, in this case along the corset bust line.

     a) If I am using fabric 1 as a stabilizer, I will fuse them together.  However, with velvet, I would probably not fuse but sew them together in the seam allowances.  If I am going to fuse, I already attached Misty fuse to the corset fabric before I cut it out.  Once the bust line is sewn, I fuse.

    b) If I am going to cut fabric 1 free after sewing them both together to keep the bodice from being too bulky, I do so after I run the zigzag attachment stitch.  Then, on the wrong side, I neatly cut near the stitching to remove the extra fabric.

5 – Now, using a good tear-away, I satin stitch over where the 2 fabrics meet.  I have done this with contrasting threads and with matching.

Why do I do all of this instead of creating an actual pattern with seam allowances?  Because I already know that my pattern fits as is and creating a sweetheart neckline pattern with seam allowances will create (for me, I just know it!) issues with puckering, fabric not laying right in the center, etc.  This way, I do it all as if it is a giant applique and no matter what shape I use, it works and lays beautifully.  Quite frankly, this is fast.

In the above pics, the only one that I did not cut away was the pink and black one.  I felt that the angle of the pink might not resist stretching even though it is all interfaced with a fusible.  I left the black intact underneath.

Edited 9/27/2010: Nowadays, I digitize this entire process so I am doing all of this in my massive hoop. If you would like more info about that, just ask!!

5 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. jwalkerdances
    Apr 24, 2008 @ 13:27:53

    Thanks, Ann. I’ve been trying to work out in my mind exactly how to do this, and this explanation is incredibly helpful. I really appreciate the insight.

  2. colmurph
    Apr 24, 2008 @ 15:32:55

    Sure, now that I have just finished the bodice of this velvet corset style dress…..here is the answer key!!! This is what I get for having Murphy’s on both sides of my family…Murphy’s law to the max.

    Good to know that I did mine the same way….(so patting myself on the shoulder!!!!) Ann Thanks so much for sharing, you are the best. Colleen

  3. kktsews
    Apr 24, 2008 @ 17:15:51

    I also came up with this solution for what I called the “yoke” on my dd’s dress (pic in Katherine’s dress album on the IDD board). One HUGE applique. I couldn’t wrap my head around adding seam allowances and dealing with a curved seam perpendicular to the princess seams. This really is easy. BTW, I didn’t cut away my base fabric, but then, my base was a satin and the yoke a holograph lycra. The top is a bit heavy, but I was afraid of having a funky line if I cut away the base.
    Katherine

  4. snipper0104
    Apr 25, 2008 @ 19:27:40

    Ann, thanks so much. You always explain things so beautifully. I have printed out your answer to keep at my side as I work. I may not get to start for a couple more weeks, but I will post pics on the ID forum. Thanks again.
    Debbie

  5. Trackback: Camouflage « Taoknitter

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